Budgeting for a garage: Stage 3 - Permit costs and site works

Budgeting for a garage: Stage 3 - Permit costs and site works
Building the ideal garage that’s within your budget means that you need to have a good grasp of what each step of the process involves. Without proper planning and research, you can blow out your budget because so many aspects were unaccounted for.

Building the ideal garage within your budget means that you need to have a good grasp of what each step of the process involves. Without proper planning and research, you can blow out your budget because so many aspects were unaccounted for.

 

That’s why we’re doing a series of blogs on the budgeting and building process for a garage. After you’ve planned out the electrical work and plumbing with licensed tradies, you need to prepare for permit costs and site works.

 

The type of permit you’ll need (and the costs that come with it) will depend on your structure, area, and local town planner. 

 

Site works can seem straightforward because it’s the execution of everything you’ve planned. But it’s important to have budget allowances for this stage because it can involve additional (and unexpected) costs.

Permits costs for a garage

 

First, you need to make an initial assessment of your area to know the permit requirements you’ll need to fulfil. Every building (even a garage) needs a permit to ensure that it’s aligned with environmental and planning regulations. A homeowner can be heavily fined if they don’t have the proper permits.

 

Planning permits relate to the use and development of land under the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Local Councils usually issue them under the local planning scheme. Planning permits generally refer to environmental factors such as trees, waterways, and bushfire zones. However, building and planning regulations can overlap in some instances, such as flooding and bushfire zones.

 

A building permit generally relates only to the construction aspects of a particular building or development. It shows that your plans and specifications comply with building regulations and allows building work to start. A building permit can be obtained from a registered private or local council building surveyor. They will advise if either an occupancy permit or a certificate of final inspection is required to complete the building work.

 

Most homeowners planning to build a garage obtain a standard building permit. But you can be exempted if it:

 
  • Has a floor area not exceeding 10 square meters

  • Is not more than three meters in height, or no more than 2.4 meters in height within one meter of the boundary; 

  • Is secondary to a main building of another class on the same allotment and located no further forward on the allotment than the front wall of the main building

  • Is the only Class 10a building and is not secondary to another building of another class on the same allotment and is set back at least nine meters from the front street alignment and at least two meters from each side street alignment

  • Is not constructed of masonry

 

building permit in Australia for a standard domestic garage can cost between $500 to $1,000, though it can go up to $2,000 depending on the size and costs of the structure. 

 

Take note that a building permit includes a commencement and completion date for the construction of your garage. If you’re still building past the deadline, you will be required to request an extension from your building surveyor.

 

To ensure that your permit request goes smoothly, call your local town planner to check if a planning permit is required and organise a pre-planning meeting. This ensures that you understand the process, obtain the right permit/s, and minimise the risk of being rejected.

 

If a planning permit is not required, give us a call to start the building permit process for you.

Site works of a garage

 

Site works include everything your concreters need to do to prepare a site for construction. It’s a labour-intensive process, so you must know the steps going into it:

 
  1. Remove clutter from your yard (e.g. bikes, sporting equipment, toys, etc.) so that concreters have clear access to the site.

  2. Concreters will measure and mark out your garage to ensure that it fits in the location and that its position is easily identifiable.

  3. Then concreters will dig the foundations underground to help keep your garage stable and secure.

  4. A registered building inspector will inspect and assess your site (e.g. foundations are correct sizes, location of garage is as per the permit, and the right steelwork is being used). This will be outlined in your permit, so make sure to review it beforehand.

  5. Once you get the inspector’s approval, concreters will pour concrete.

 

Depending on the structure of your garage, the site works can be inexpensive and minor or complex and costly if builders need to use heavy equipment (e.g. bobcats, pumps, etc.). There’s also the possibility of more extensive work like felling trees, levelling the site, or retaining walls. 

 

The average site works cost for a garage ranges from $80 per hour to $120 hour. This can go higher, depending on:

 
  • Size of your garage

  • Quality and quantity of mesh needed

  • Skills and experience of your concreter

  • Accessibility of location (i.e. if you’ll need to provide truck access for concrete)

 

If you have any more questions about permit costs and site works for a garage, give us a call. You can also look through the budgeting checklist on our website to guide you through the building process of your garage.

 

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