Why shed and carport walls must be fire-resistant

Why shed and carport walls must be fire-resistant
Combustible cladding has become a real issue in recent times and it’s something that needs urgent attention (and action). While this problem goes well beyond garden sheds and carports, its central theme of keeping people and property safe from fire does not.

From Melbourne to London’s Grenfell Tower disaster. Combustible cladding surrounding apartment buildings was an (assumingly) unforeseen problem that’s had devastating consequences. 

 

In fact, the issue is considered so widespread that RMIT University estimates the repair bill for Victorian residential apartments needing a cladding overhaul will cost approximately $1.6 billion. 

 

While this problem goes well beyond garages and carports, its central theme of keeping people and property safe from fire does not. That’s why Shed Bonanza is committed to selling garages and carports that meet fire safety requirements.

 

What is a fire separation wall? 

 

While explanations vary, it’s generally accepted that a fire separation wall is a wall that is resistant to the spread of fire and divides an external building or separate floor or storey.  

 

Obviously, the more resistant the wall the less likely a fire will cause further damage. This means that during the construction of a garage or carport, the wall needs to meet certain specifications, such as the wall extended up to the underside of a roof. 

 

As a general rule (although please speak to us regarding your situation), a brick wall with no windows is considered a fire separation wall. 

 

What is a fire-rated wall? 

 

The National Construction Code states that a Class 10a building is a non-habitable building including sheds, carports, and private garages. 

 

If a Class 10a building is located between or adjacent to a Class 1 building (a single dwelling detached house, or one or more attached dwellings), it must comply with Figure 3.7.2.4 Construction of external walls of the Acceptable Construction Practice.  

 

In the same guide, Figure 3.7.2.5 indicates that: 

 

  • The Class 10a building is not less than 900 mm from the allotment boundary, other than the boundary adjoining a road alignment or other public space;

  • An external wall of the Class 10a building which is less than 900 mm from an allotment boundary, other than the boundary adjoining a road alignment or other public space, complies with 3.7.2.4;

  • An external wall of the Class 10a building, which is less than 900 mm from the Class 1 building, complies with 3.7.2.4;

  • The Class 1 building is not less than 900 mm from the Class 10a building;

  • An external wall of the Class 1 building, which is less than 900 mm from the Class 10a building, complies with 3.7.2.4;

  • An external wall of the Class 10a building which is less than 900 mm from an allotment boundary other than the boundary adjoining a road alignment or other public space, complies with 3.7.2.4;

  • An external wall of the Class 10a building, which is less than 900 mm from the external wall of the Class 1 building, complies with 3.7.2.4;

  • An external wall of the Class 1 building, which is less than 900 mm from a Class 10a building that is situated less than 900 mm from an allotment boundary, complies with 3.7.2.4; and

  • The external wall of Class 1 and Class 10a buildings which are less than 900 mm from an allotment boundary, other than the boundary adjoining a road alignment or other public space, complies with 3.7.2.4.

 

Boral Fireclad wall system 

Boral Fireclad fire rated exterior wall system is compliant and industry-leading when building a shed or carport. 

Boral developed its Fireclad wall system in conjunction with BlueScope Steel. This product is light-weight and provides an alternative to precast concrete or masonry fire rated external walls for new and existing sheds or carports. 

The benefits of this product are that it is suitable for new construction and upgrades of existing sheds and carports and are quick to install and can be prefabricated. Importantly, it has a fire rating of up to two hours when outside of the shed or carport. 

Nobody wants another cladding disaster. The impact both personally and financially will be felt for a number of years yet. To stop the spread of fire, measures need to be in place when it comes to updating or building a new shed or carport. 

To ensure your safety and the longevity of your shed or carport, Shed Bonanza recommends building your shed or carport with industry compliant products, such as the Boral Fireclad fire rated exterior wall systems. 

Is your shed or carport fire resistant? 

If you’re unsure, check out our building permits checklist. 

 

Be the first to receive exclusive offers on our products and services, tips and how-to's directly in your inbox.